Quantinuum’s H1 Quantum Computer Executes Complex Algorithm with Flawless Precision


September 28, 2023

Quantinuum’s H1 Quantum Computer Executes Complex Algorithm with Flawless Precision

Summary: Quantinuum, the world's largest integrated quantum computing company, has demonstrated the first fault-tolerant method using three logically-encoded qubits on their Quantum H1 computer, paving the way for practical solutions to real-world problems in molecular simulation, artificial intelligence, optimization, and cybersecurity.

  • Quantinuum has demonstrated the first fault-tolerant method using three logically-encoded qubits on their Quantum H1 computer.
  • The team achieved an impressive error rate almost ten times lower than that of an unencoded circuit.
  • The successful implementation of this gate on real hardware proves that fault-tolerant quantum computing is now capable of running all essential operations together.


Quantum Computing has long been hailed as the future of technology, promising to revolutionize fields such as medicine, finance, and AI. However, achieving fault-tolerant quantum computers, which are necessary for practical applications, has been a major challenge. In a significant development, scientists from Quantinuum, the world’s largest integrated quantum computing company, have demonstrated the first fault-tolerant method using three logically-encoded qubits on their Quantum H1 computer.

The team’s breakthrough opens up possibilities for practical solutions to real-world problems in molecular simulation, artificial intelligence, optimization, and cybersecurity. This achievement builds on previous milestones in hardware, software, and error correction, showcasing the rapid progress being made in the field.

Many companies and research groups are focused on tackling the noise that arises during quantum computing operations to achieve fault-tolerance. Quantinuum has been at the forefront of this effort, having previously demonstrated entangling gates between two logical qubits in a fully fault-tolerant manner and simulating the hydrogen molecule with two logically-encoded qubits.

By performing one-bit addition using the smallest-known fault-tolerant circuit, the team achieved an impressive error rate almost ten times lower than that of an unencoded circuit. The physical error rates of Quantinuum’s H-Series quantum computers, based on the quantum charge-coupled device (QCCD) architecture, are the lowest known to date. These low error rates make fault-tolerant algorithms feasible.

Ilyas Khan, Chief Product Officer and Founder at Quantinuum, emphasized the significance of this demonstration, stating that it showcases what is possible in the early days of quantum computing. He also highlighted the ingenuity behind the ion trap architecture of their H-Series, which offers low physical error rates and flexibility in implementing error-correcting codes.

The team achieved their results by utilizing low-overhead logical Clifford gates and the transversal CCZ gate of the three-dimensional color code. This approach reduced the number of two-Qubit gates and measurements required for one-bit addition from over 1000 to just 36.

Ben Criger, Senior Research Scientist at Quantinuum and principal investigator on the paper, highlighted the importance of the CCZ gate demonstrated in this work. This gate is a crucial component in various quantum algorithms, including Shor’s algorithm and quantum Monte Carlo. The successful implementation of this gate on real hardware proves that fault-tolerant quantum computing is now capable of running all essential operations together.

As Quantinuum continues to push the boundaries of quantum computing, we can expect further computational advances that bridge the gap between high-quality hardware and real-world applications. The future of quantum technology is becoming increasingly tangible, and it holds immense potential for solving some of humanity’s most pressing challenges.

Quantinuum’s H1 Quantum Computer Executes Complex Algorithm with Flawless Precision

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Technology Explained


Quantum Computing: Quantum computing is a type of advanced computing that takes advantage of the strange behaviors of very small particles. It's like having a supercharged computer that can solve incredibly complex problems much faster than regular computers. It does this by using special "bits" that can be both 0 and 1 at the same time, which allows it to process information in a very unique way. This technology has the potential to make a big impact in areas like data security and solving really tough scientific challenges, but there are still some technical hurdles to overcome before it becomes widely useful.



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